24 Days of Christmas Films: Day 12-A Charlie Brown Christmas

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This is an oldie but a goodie. While my sister and I never really watched the Peanut cartoons when we were little (I preferred the comics), my mother used to love them and it was a love she used to try to pass on by encouraging us to watch this every year.

With imaginative, relatable characters and iconic music it’s not surprising that A Charlie Brown Christmas is something that still manages to compel children, long after they’ve transitioned into adulthood. It’s surprising re-watching it as an adult how profound the message is behind this short film, as when I was little all I noticed was the Charlie Brown was sad about Christmas. But as an adult I realised that it’s actually the widespread of commercialism that’s got Charlie down, and is the cause as to why he throws himself into directing the Christmas play, although alas to no avail. As Charlie’s friends come together and we see Charlie realise that there is still more to Christmas than shopping and presents, it’s not just Charlie’s spirits who are raised. Whilst Linus’ recitation of Luke 2:8-14 highlights the simple intentions of what Christmas should really be about, peace and goodwill to all men.  Whether you’re religious or not it’ll have a different impact for you, but as someone who is the latter I love this reference as it brings me back to my childhood performing the Nativity, and the genuine joy and promise that Christmas would bring every year.

At its core that is what a Charlie Brown Christmas is all about, characters coming together in a touching and sentimental way to remind us what should be most important at Christmastime, and that is something that I think we sometimes need to be reminded of.

 

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24 Days of Christmas Films: Day 6-A Christmas Story

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This is often quoted as a lot of people’s favourite Christmas film and it’s easy to understand as it’s packed with Christmassy nostalgia .

It certainly lacks the extravagance of Christmas that we’re used to seeing in more modern Christmas films, but that’s part of the charm as we’re reminded of the joy that can be gleamed simply with a child receiving their dream gift on Christmas morning. Every person watching can relate to the plight of 9 year old Ralphie and his attempts to persuade his parents that the one gift they are adamant he can’t have, is the one that he wants more that any other. I mean in my case it was an Amazing Aly (prime example of only 90s kids will know) but the pain is still the same.

Another factor working in its favour is that it’s a genuinely funny film, with moments such as when Ralphie is forced to literally clean his mouth out with soap after swearing and takes the moment to reflect on the differences between the types of soaps he’s been forced to taste. Plus who can forget the iconic bunny onesie scene?! Ultimately it’s the realistic script and natural chemistry between the actors that has made this film one for the ages, as every person watching will be able to recount similar experiences from their childhood, as we watch Ralphie tackle un-sympathetic teaches, nagging parents and the brutal battle zone that is the playground.

There’s a certain innocence in the portrayal of Christmas in this film where children would gather around the radio as opposed to the product placement heavy children TV shows of today. Not to mention that buying a 9 year old a BB gun nowadays whilst not only probably being illegal, would stir up a whole host of media debate. I know I sound like the stereotypical grandparent insisting that everything was better in the ‘good ol’days’ but in the case of this film that is what makes it such a success. Plus if there was ever a time for some good old nostalgia then it’s at Christmas time.